How To Sleep Better

Welcome to our Feature Series, bombshell!

While I’m blissfully away on maternity leave nurturing my bundle of joy, we’ve invited incredible leaders from different fields to speak about what they know best. I hope that the stories shared will inspire action and reflection within you, as they undoubtedly have within me.

Today Dr. Deb Kern, a dear friend, client and mentor, is sharing her simple but oh-so effective tip for sleeping better.

Make sure you make her feel right at home with lots of love in the comments.


morning time background, alarm clock near the bed at home

Do you sleep with your cellphone nearby?

Are you scrolling through social media up until the moment you fall asleep?

Do you check for new messages when you get up to go to the bathroom at 3 AM? Or first thing when you wake up?

If so, it’s gotta stop!

I’m not sure exactly how or when I stopped using an alarm clock and began using my cell phone to wake me up, but like many of you I’ve been sleeping with my iPhone within arm’s reach.


I thought that since my phone was on Airplane Mode it wouldn’t harm my health. But I was wrong! 


Here’s why:

Studies have shown that being exposed to the blue and white light given off by phones, laptops and other electronic gadgets at night prevents our brains from releasing melatonin; a hormone that tells our bodies it’s nighttime.

Yikes!

I had been looking at that little screen up until the moment I turn the phone off and roll over to go to sleep.

Aaand, it’s not just the light that’s harmful. It turns out that exposure to mobile radiation means that we’ll…

  • … take longer to fall asleep;
  • … spend less time in deep sleep;
  • … miss out on the components of sleep that help up recover from daily wear and tear.

The solution? An old-fashioned alarm clock.

Choose one that only lights up when you press a button or has an amber, orange or red light {those colors are best for restful sleep}.

And, pick one that wakes you up with a sound that isn’t shocking to your nervous system.

A good night’s sleep can enhance:

  • digestion
  • hormone balance
  • metabolism
  • mood
  • muscle repair
  • cognitive function

Yes, please!

So, do yourself a favor. Use an alarm clock and leave your cell phone in another room {or at least 6 feet away from your bed on airplane mode}.

Here’s to your healthy sleep!


DDebKern-119r. Deb Kern is a health scientist, women’s wellness expert and creator of PranaShakti Dance.  Her groundbreaking research showed that mind/body integrated forms of exercise reduce anxiety more effectively than conventional ones. Dr. Kern has studied herbal medicine while living with indigenous women in the Costa Rican rainforest and practiced a yogic lifestyle while living on an ashram in the U.S. as well as in the jungles of Bali. Her varied studies have helped her evolve practices and tools that help people fully experience the power of the body-mind connection.

Dr. Kern studied Nursing at Vanderbilt University and holds a B.A. and an M.B.A. from the University of Texas at Austin, as well as a Ph.D. in Health Sciences from Texas Woman’s University in Denton, Texas. In addition, she is a Black Belt Nia Teacher, a certified Integral Hatha Yoga Instructor, a Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapist, and a Mindful Change Coach. Dr. Kern is passionate about creating health, balance, serenity and joy in her professional life, as well as her personal life as a mother to a 19-year-old son and 29-year-old stepson. She has observed, time and time again, that when we take actions in our own healing and become aware of the patterns that disconnect body and mind, miracles can occur in every area of our lives—and she adores inspiring others to experience these miracles.


Pop your questions and insights in the comments below or reach out to Deb directly over on Facebook. We can’t wait to hear from you!

 

 

 

P.S. If you like this, you’ll love Deb’s piece on what to do if you’re having trouble getting out of bed in the morning. Take a peek here, bombshell.

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